When the New York Times revealed the warrantless surveillance of voice calls, in December 2005, the telephone companies got nervous. - Barton Gellman

When the New York Times revealed the warrantless surveillance of voice calls, in December 2005, the telephone companies got nervous.

by Barton Gellman

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